Cougars (Mountain Lions) in Metro Portland? Yes, and Here’s Why!

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July 14, 2014 – by Dominic Aiello, President

Cougars (Mountain Lions) in Metro Portland? Yes, and Here’s Why!

Photo Credit: KOIN 6

Photo Credit: KOIN 6

Does it seem normal to you that there have been well over a dozen cougar sightings reported in metro Portland in June & July (so far)? The clear answer is no, large apex predators do not belong in urban areas! This raises an important question, why are cougars and bears regularly appearing in Portland, Beaverton, Hillsboro and other metro Portland areas?

If you recall, I wrote an article on this very topic back in April, Enough Deception – Does Oregon Have A Cougar Problem? YES! (click here to read).

The short and simple answer is, cougars have reached a population level that requires them to leave their typical and preferred habitat to search for food and territory free of other big dominate cats.  The problem is, because we have such a high level (or overpopulation) of cougars, the only territory left is our populated cites.

How Did We Get To This Point?

In 1994 environmental and anti-hunting groups preyed on the emotion of uniformed voters and passed a ban on the ONLY effective way to manage cougar populations, hounds. We are currently experiencing the results of this action, and it’s only going to get worse if action isn’t taken. One only has to look at California, which does not allow hunting of cougars at all, to see where we’re headed.

One recent news article points out,

According to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, there has never been a documented attack by a cougar on a human in the wild [in Oregon]. The California Department of Fish and Game, though, lists 13 such attacks since 1985. Three of the attacks were fatal.

Here is a Timeline of Recent Cougar & Bear Incidents in Metro Portland

Don’t forget to subscribe to our email alerts, using the form in the top right hand of your screen, to receive updates on this and other important wildlife issues facing Oregon and Oregon’s conservationist — you the sportsmen or women!

http://koin.com/2014/07/22/park-closed-after-cougar-sighting-in-hillsboro/
July 23, 2014 – Park closed after cougar sighting in Hillsboro

The Hillsboro Police Department said a resident reported seeing a cougar before 5:30 p.m. and thought it was headed in the direction of the park.

http://koin.com/2014/07/14/cougars-spotted-in-oregon-city/
July 14, 2014 – Cougars spotted in Oregon City

Saturday, one resident called police around 8:45 p.m. and said there was a cougar laying down at the southwest end of her property on Harley Avenue between LaRae and Cleveland streets.

About six hours later, a second person reported seeing two cougars around Swan and Cleveland streets, about a half-mile from the other location.

http://www.kptv.com/story/26001674/cougar-sightings-reported-in-beaverton-hillsboro
July 11, 2014 – Cougar sightings reported in Beaverton, Hillsboro

Two more cougar sightings were reported Friday in the Portland area, a week after another cougar was spotted and euthanized in NE Portland.

Danny Zell, who lives and works in Hillsboro, said his co-worker called him Friday morning to say he had seen a cougar crossing the road, and says he saw it with his own eyes minutes later in a field at the corner of Highway 219 and Burkhalter Road.

I slowed down on my way to work and looked right in the field there and there’s the cougar. A real big one, nice long tail, just kind of minding its own business, Zell said.

John McDonald, who farms hazelnuts just across the road from where Zell spotted the cougar, said the proximity to his farm and his home makes him nervous.

I’ve talked to some of my colleagues, farmers and so forth, and they’ve started carrying rifles. Putting scabbards on their tractors and so forth. And frankly, I’m considering that, McDonald said.

According to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, there has never been a documented attack by a cougar on a human in the wild. The California Department of Fish and Game, though, lists 13 such attacks since 1985. Three of the attacks were fatal.

http://www.kgw.com/news/Cougar-caught-in-Happy-Valley-tree-266502041.html
July 9, 2014 – Cougar spotted outside Happy Valley [PreSchool]

A cougar was reportedly spotted near a Happy Valley preschool Wednesday afternoon and then a short time later, at the Happy Valley Elementary School, officials said.

http://koin.com/2014/07/04/cougar-spotted-3-times-in-portland-friday-morning/
July 4, 2014 – Cougar euthanized after hours in tree near BBQ

After a number of reported sightings of cougars throughout the Portland metro area — including three early Friday — a cougar was spotted up a tree in Northeast Portland.

The approximately 110-pound cougar was euthanized by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff, said ODFW spokesperson Meg Kanady, because it had lost its fear of people.

http://www.katu.com/news/local/Woman-believes-cougar-killed-her-house-cat-neighbors-come-up-with-plan-265631021.html
July 2, 2014 – Woman believes cougar killed her cat, neighbors come up with plan

A group of neighbors in East Portland want to warn others about a possible cougar in the area after five calls to police related to a cougar within a week.

One of those calls was after part of Margaret Bell’s cat was found dead in the lawn.

What was left of an 18 pound cat, maybe if we’re lucky, is a half a pound, said Bell. It’s sad.

http://kxl.com/2014/06/30/portland-area-cougar-sightings-continue-to-come-in/
June 30, 2014 – Portland Area Cougar Sightings Continue to Come in

KEEP CHILDREN CLOSE – Always keep children close by and in sight.

http://koin.com/2014/06/29/ppb-cougar-spotted-near-mill-park-neighborhood/
June 29, 2014 – Cougar spotted near Mill Park neighborhood

Residents in the Mill Park neighborhood of Southeast Portland called police early Sunday morning to report seeing a cougar.

Two different callers called police around 5:20 a.m. and said they saw the cougar heading north in the area of SE 121st and Division.

http://koin.com/2014/06/26/second-hillsboro-cougar-sighting-closes-jackson-bottom-trails/
June 26, 2014 – ‘Arrogant, majestic’ cougar riles Hillsboro neighborhood

When nut farmer Stan Hayes encountered a cougar in his Hillsboro orchard near the Jackson Bottom Preserve, he reached for the knife on his hip, then froze, terrified.

http://www.kptv.com/story/25851765/unconfirmed-cougar-sighting-in-hillsboro-wetland-preserve
June 23, 2014 – Reported cougar sighting near Hillsboro wetland preserve

Hillsboro Parks & Recreation staff closed the trails at the preserve

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2014/06/black_bear_on_the_loose_in_ne.html
June 11, 2014 – Black bear on the loose in NE Portland has been tranquilized

Photo Credit: Beth Nakamura/ The Oregonian

Photo Credit: Beth Nakamura/ The Oregonian

The mid-sized bear darted across Northeast Killingsworth about 6 a.m. Wednesday morning, prompting police to clear the block of onlookers and media gathered between Northeast 35th Place and Northeast 36th Avenue.

http://koin.com/2014/05/08/possible-cougar-sightings-near-beaverton-elementary/
May 8, 2014 – Possible cougar sightings near Beaverton elementary

Administrators at a Beaverton elementary received two separate reports of a cougar sighting near the school Wednesday, a school district official confirms.

Following the unconfirmed sightings, Ridgewood Elementary principal Scot Stockwell sent out an audio-dial message to parents.

http://koin.com/2014/04/30/cougar-spotted-southeast-portland/
April 30, 2014 – Cougar spotted in Southwest Portland

Hayhurst School, which sits directly adjacent to the park, went on precautionary lock down

What Needs To Be Done?

It’s clear that Oregon has a cougar problem & an overpopulation of cougars. With California suffering from 13 maulings and 3 fatalities in recent years no other reason should be needed for Oregon’s politicians to take action by bring back proper wildlife management!

Subscribe to our email alerts, using the form in the top right hand of your screen, to receive updates on this and other important wildlife issues facing Oregon and Oregon’s conservationist — you the sportsmen or women!

Happy Hunting
Dominic Aiello Oregon outdoor Council
Dominic Aiello, President